3 Major Direct Mail Design Mistakes

 

Despite the declining numbers of direct mail graphic design campaigns, there’s an opportunity for savvy companies to use the situation to their advantage. With less noise to drown out your message, you can start sending laser-targeted direct mail to potential customers with a high conversion rate.

The only thing missing is an effective design that will make it all possible.

In order to prevent a possible misfire, you have to avoid the most common direct mail design mistakes that can seriously hurt your chances for success. Whether you’re acting on your own or hiring a team of professionals to design your prints, it’s useful to know and watch out for any possible pitfalls.

Trying to Please Everyone

No product is going to be popular with everyone. Even though most businesses know this, things can get out of hand when they’re trying to maximize the return on investment by broadening their reach. The more you try to appeal to a wider audience, the less potent your marketing message becomes.

A product that everyone tolerates but no one is passionate about is a dead weight to a company. Instead of trying to please everyone, focus on your potential customers. If your message is compelling, it will engage consumers outside of your target market without losing its power over the core audience.

Using the Wrong Format

When coming up with a direct mail graphic design, there are countless different styles and formats to choose from. Each option fits a certain product and would be ineffective or downright devastating for others.

Finding the best format is usually a skill acquired through trial and error. The only way to avoid this costly learning process is hiring a professional company with an experienced design team. By combining your vision and their knowledge, you will create a direct mail graphic design idea that will appeal specifically to your target audience.

Losing Focus

A good sales copy is engaging and straightforward. Its goal is to sell your product through convincing sales pitches and well-placed calls to action. If your design doesn’t reflect the same idea, your message will appear weak and unfocused.

It’s important to present gripping visuals and creative designs that get your readers’ attention, but if they don’t point them in the right direction, that attention is wasted. You should also get to the point as soon as possible, or you’ll lose potential clients who would otherwise become interested in your product.

Showing what the offer is about comes before telling why it’s good. Your readers will expect to read a sales copy, not a mystery novel.

These were 3 major direct mail design mistakes.

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